Trading futures and options contracts examples


Unlike other options the holder does not have the right to buy or sell the underlying asset. They are relatively new in Australia and are a speculative, high risk product. Futures and options are complex products. Even experienced investors will struggle to understand the risks involved in trading them. We recommend you do not invest in these products unless you have a written Statement of Advice from an independent, licensed financial planner stating that the product is suitable for you.

Seek financial advice if you need further information and assistance about futures and options. Futures Options Futures Futures are contracts to buy or sell a particular asset or cash equivalent on a specified future date. Options An option is a contract between two parties. Binary options Binary options are a type of option where you try to predict the short-term movements of a share price, currency, index or commodity.

Warning Futures and options are complex products. There are many different types of options out there, and each one would require its own website worth of information to grasp each individual concept.

That already sounds a little convoluted…see, I told you that it may take a few days to sink in. Think about it this way…if you were at a department store and you wanted to buy a DVD player that was on sale, but then you found out that the last one was sold before you had a chance to get to it, most stores will allow you to create a raincheck for that item.

The whole point of buying call options is that you expect the price to rise in the relatively near future. So if Corn is trading at For instance, as of this writing, with Corn trading at about Another HUGE benefit of buying call options is the fact that unlike buying the futures contract your risk is limited; with buying options, you can never lose more than your initial investment.

So with our Corn call option example Once you buy the option, your risk is set, and you now have the right to buy one Corn contract stock at the If Corn were to have a major spike in price and shot up to For example, if you were to buy a call option on Corn with a strike price of So, buying a Corn call option with a But if Corn were to have a dramatic and quick spike in price, and it jumped up to Nonetheless, I hope this little diddy on call options explained has at least begun to bring some clarity to this detailed area of investing.

How are Stock Futures settled? Can I square up my position? When am I required to pay initial margin to my broker? Do I have to pay mark-to-market margin? What are the profits and losses in case of a Stock Futures position? What is the market lot for Stock Futures? Why are the market lots different for different stocks?